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25 Famous People Who were Homeless

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A lack of affordable housing and the limited scale of housing assistance programs have contributed to the current housing crisis and to homelessness. Recently, foreclosures have also increased the number of people who experience homelessness.

Homelessness and poverty are inextricably linked. Poor people are frequently unable to pay for housing, food, childcare, health care, and education. Difficult choices must be made when limited resources cover only some of these necessities. Often it is housing, which absorbs a high proportion of income that must be dropped. If you are poor, you are essentially an illness, an accident, or a paycheck away from living on the streets.

THE NEW FACE OF HOMELESSNESS

image-2Lack of Employment Opportunities – With unemployment rates remaining high, jobs are hard to find in the current economy. Even if people can find work, this does not automatically provide an escape from poverty.

Decline in Available Public Assistance – The declining value and availability of public assistance is another source of increasing poverty and homelessness and many families leaving welfare struggle to get medical care, food, and housing as a result of loss of benefits, low wages, and unstable employment. Additionally, most states have not replaced the old welfare system with an alternative that enables families and individuals to obtain above-poverty employment and to sustain themselves when work is not available or possible.

THOUSANDS OF HOMELESS WOMEN VETERANS

image-5Lack of Affordable Health Care – For families and individuals struggling to pay the rent, a serious illness or disability can start a downward spiral into homelessness, beginning with a lost job, depletion of savings to pay for care, and eventual eviction.

Domestic Violence – Battered women who live in poverty are often forced to choose between abusive relationships and homelessness. In addition, 50% of the cities surveyed by the U.S. Conference of Mayors identified domestic violence as a primary cause of homelessness (U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2005).

Mental Illness – Approximately 16% of the single adult homeless population suffers from some form of severe and persistent mental illness (U.S. Conference of Mayors, 2005).

Addiction – The relationship between addiction and homelessness is complex and controversial. Many people who are addicted to alcohol and drugs never become homeless, but people who are poor and addicted are clearly at increased risk of homelessness.

HOUSING & HOMELESSNESS RESOURCES

Women veterans are the minority of both the veteran population and the working population.

VASH Program – The HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program combines Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) rental assistance for homeless Veterans with case management and clinical services provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).  VA provides these services for participating Veterans at VA medical centers (VAMCs) and community-based outreach clinics.

SSVF – Under the SSVF program, VA awards grants to private non-profit organizations and consumer cooperatives who can provide supportive services to very low-income Veteran families living in or transitioning to permanent housing. Grantees provide eligible Veteran families with outreach, case management, and assistance in obtaining VA and other benefits, which may include: ŸHealth care services Ÿ- Daily living services -Ÿ Personal financial planning services Ÿ- Transportation services Ÿ- Fiduciary and payee services Ÿ- Legal services -Ÿ Child care services -Ÿ Housing counseling services. In addition, grantees may also provide time-limited payments to third parties (e.g., landlords, utility companies, moving companies, and licensed child care providers) if these payments help Veteran families stay in or acquire permanent housing on a sustainable basis.   List of SSVF Providers by State (Excel Doc)

Homeless Veteran Stand Downs – Stand Downs are typically one- to three-day events providing supplies and services to homeless Veterans, such as food, shelter, clothing, health screenings and VA Social Security benefits counseling. Veterans can also receive referrals to other assistance such as health care, housing solutions, employment, substance use treatment and mental health counseling. They are collaborative events, coordinated between local VA Medical Centers, other government agencies and community-based homeless service providers.

PATH (California) – PATH (People Assisting the Homeless) provides the support homeless veterans need in order to successfully transition from living on the street to thriving in homes of their own. High quality supportive services are critical to ensuring the people we serve are able to move into permanent homes, and stay in those homes long-term. PATH pledges to house at least 1,000 veterans by 2014.

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans – The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans (NCHV) is the resource and technical assistance center for a national network of community-based service providers and local, state and federal agencies that provide emergency and supportive housing, food, health services, job training and placement assistance, legal aid and case management support for hundreds of thousands of homeless veterans each year.

MILITARY SEXUAL TRAUMA RESOURCES

VA MST Services“While MST can be a very difficult experience, recovery is possible. At the VA, Veterans can receive free, confidential treatment for mental and physical health conditions related to MST. You may be able to receive this MST-related care even if you are not eligible for other VA services. To receive these services, you do not need a VA service-connected disability rating, to have reported the incident when it happened, or have other documentation that it occurred. Eligibility for MST-related treatment is entirely separate from the disability claims process.  VA has a range of services available to meet Veterans wherever they are in their recovery.”

Make the Connection MST information & resources“Although MST can be a very difficult experience, there are treatments available that can significantly improve your quality of life. Treatment often involves addressing any immediate health and safety concerns, followed by counseling to help you learn new ways of thinking, practice positive behaviors, and take active steps to cope with the effects of MST. Treatment may focus on strategies for coping with difficult emotions and memories or, for Veterans who are ready, treatment may involve actually talking about the MST experiences in depth.”

Although a new company, the vision of IWVA.org is truly impressive. The gap between homelessness and main stream America is finally defined and a solution brought forth. Look out America, IWVA.org, is pulling up the rear and making the necessary moves to get homeless women veterans back in the workforce and standing independent.

Why IWVA.org?

Leveling the Playing Field for Women Veterans

It's about leveraging the resources we currently have to walk veterans into jobs. We are committed to using the connections we have and building on them to ensure women veterans are the first line of selection.

Training Women Veterans in basic job search skills

Providing basic job search techniques, resume and cover letter assistance, career coaching, recruiter selection, interviewing skills, and negotiating workshops to build confindence in women veterans that are actively seeking employment in the open market.

Supplying Homeless Women Veterans with essential daily necessities for introduction back into the workforce

Providing daily essentials CarePacs to homeless women veterans as we encourage and engage them.

Providing Mentoring and Support to boost Self Esteem

One of the most impactful ways mentors can influence mentees is by modeling positive behaviors that help them learn to respect themselves and others.

About Us

A non-profit organization dedicated to the well-being of Female Veterans, who have honorably severed our country and are now in need.

Our programs are built in stages allowing familiarity of the services, while building credibility with partnering vendors.

Contact Us

Find us in

Marietta, GA 30066

Or you can call us

Phone: 678.300.2957